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Costruire una radio Wi-Fi

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Inviato da technolando tramite Google Reader:

tramite Circuit-Projects.com RSS Feed di Circuit-Projects.com il 27/12/09

DIY Wi-Fi Radio Construction

The project features the development of a low cost, open source wireless streaming internet radio receiver.

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Capacimetro con AVR

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Inviato da technolando tramite Google Reader:

tramite Circuit-Projects.com RSS Feed di Circuit-Projects.com il 27/12/09

Atmel AVR Controlled Digital Capacitance Meter

The integration method was used to build this capacitance meter where it measures the time it takes a capacitor to charge to calculate the capacitance.

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Iniziare con Arduino

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tramite Liquidware Antipasto di Matt il 28/12/09
A lot of people got Arduinos for Christmas (and holiday) presents. Welcome to the world of Open Source Hardware, DIY electronic tinkering, and learning physical computing and programming... it's a long journey, and I started on it about 2 years ago, and it's been a pretty fun adventure.

As an aside, this is my favorite week of the year, because I have just enough time off from the day job to do some serious hacking. And that's what I'll be doing over the next couple days, getting ready for some serious fun in January.

I don't usually write beginner's guides, because I'm not that good at it, and also because I try to do harder and harder stuff with my Arduino every time, and try to push the limits. There are lots of Arduino tutorials and startup and setup guides, but most of them assume the read has tons of wires, sensors, and - most importantly - a few years of programming experience and are comfortable doing some DIY tinkering. Few of them assume you just have an Arduino, just the Arduino, and only the Arduino... which is what lots of people get and give as Christmas presents (if this past couple of weeks is any indication!)...

So this is my top ten list of fun things to do with a newly-acquired Arduino - I do quite a bit of tinkering with the Arduino, Arduino MEGA, and Illuminato Genesis boards, in fact these days I carry them in my travel bag pretty much everywhere I go, just to play around. The Arduino is like my swiss army knife of electronics, and the Illuminato Genesis is my favorite board for when I want to hack devices, reverse engineer protocols, or do generally "hackier" things.




1 - Make it blink

This one is pretty obvious... just download the Arduino IDE (or the Antipasto Arduino Aardvark IDE for Windows or Mac if you want to play around with some extra features), and then download this code into the main section, run it, and download it to the Arduino board.



2 - Make it blink faster (or slower)

This is almost universally the first thing anyone tries to do immediately after the blinky sketch is up and running... get comfortable with the settings by screwing around with the blink settings, by tampering around with the delay and timer settings. Whenever I'm teaching someone or showing someone else how to use an Arduino, I always suggest changing the timing, or copying and pasting the digitalWrite() and delay() lines several times to get comfortable with the programming language, and to see your code reflected in real time instantly...



3 - Make a function to make the Arduino blink

This is almost like the step above, except that now you're getting comfortable with putting your blink inside a real C function wrapper. The major difference is that I made the void myBlink( void) function. As soon as people get the hang of functions, usually a light goes off in their heads as they figure out the power of modern programming languages: code modularity (a fancy term for little chunks of reusable code):



4 - Send stuff over the serial port from the Arduino to your PC

You can blink an LED, and you can put code inside functions. That means you've now mastered about 90% of the hardest parts of using an Arduino. Now, you want to have the Arduino communicate with the computer. This is a tiny little program that sets a variable, called "counter", sets it to the number 0, then prints a little message "Hello over Serial" from the Arduino to the PC, and then loops the counter from 1 to 25, printing the number over the serial connection. Just type this code into the Arduino IDE window, download it to the Arduino, and then open up the Serial Monitor (that's one of the little blue buttons underneath the menu bar):



5 - Merge the LED blinking with the Serial

I think it's pretty cool how quickly things can add up when you have the basics down. This is basically the same thing as the previous sketches, only added together. Every time the counter reaches past 25 and resets to 0, it calls the blink-LED function, which is the same one we wrote up above - so the functions really are re-usable...



6 - Send something from the computer to the Arduino... and back...

Now we want to send something from the PC to the Arduino. Put this code onto the Arduino, then open the Serial Monitor again, and this time in the little box next to the send button that shows up, type a character, and press the Send button. The character will get echoed back. For instance if you type and send "a", you'll see the "> a" come back. This is literally the same thing as the serial read example except with no comments, which get in the way. By the way, I also encourage anyone new to Arduino to type this out by hand, instead of just copying and pasting, because it seems to give a better idea for what each line of code does.



7 - Combine the Serial sending with blinking

This time, we'll add the code function for the LED blinking, and a couple lines of code that basically say, if the character we sent from the PC to the Arduino is the letter "a", then blink the LED light in the myBlink() function:



8 - Put everything together in one big mega program - count, blink, echo, and blink again

This one's pretty self-explanatory. Now, we've just added all the components together. All the variables get defined up at the top, the serial connection gets initialized in the setup() function, the counter cycles from 1-25 over the serial connection, blinks every time it reaches the top, checks to see if the PC sent a character, if we did, the Arduino will echo the character back to the PC, and if that character is the letter "a", the Arduino will blink again.



9 - Copy and paste the following code:

The Arduino is all about copying and pasting code. This is hugely helpful, because it speeds up hacking, but it's kind of like how word-checker is destroying my abaility to spell words :-) If you always just copy and paste stuff, it's no fun because half of feeling comfortable programming and hacking with the Arduino is feeling comfortable pulling code out of thin air, and experimenting with the syntax... but that's just my opinion!

int counter = 0;
int ledPin = 13;
int incomingByte = 0;

void setup() {
Serial.begin(9600); delay(100);
}

void loop()
{
counter++;
Serial.println(counter);
if(counter == 25) { counter = 0; myBlink(); };

if (Serial.available() > 0) {
incomingByte = Serial.read();
Serial.print("> ");
Serial.println(incomingByte,BYTE);
if (incomingByte == 'a') { myBlink(); };
}

delay(100);
}

void myBlink( void) {
digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH); delay(500);
digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW); delay(500);
}


10 - Meet people on the web who use Arduinos

Arduino is about the interweb, and forums, and chat rooms, and blogs, and twitters, and youtube instructables and vimeo facebook wallposts and all kinds of "social media" that I have no idea how to use, but am trying to learn.

It's also about being an open community, and instead of so many types of technologies and new things that are inaccessible and hard to learn, Arduino is about sharing and hacking with other people. So in that spirit, please email me, or twitter me, or whatever!

2010 is going to be a year filled with Arduino hacking for me, and my goal is to meet as many other fellow hackers as possible, and to show off more cool Arduino hacks :-)

inthebitz at gmail


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Robot Ginnasta

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Horizontal bar robot gymnast in training (Video)

Robot gymnastics
Hinamitetu’s robot gymnast is getting better and better, but still needs a lot of work on its horizontal bar dismount before the Robot Olympics qualifying meets start in the Spring.

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Arpa laser con Arduino

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Inviato da technolando tramite Google Reader:

tramite Hack a Day di Mike Szczys il 23/12/09

[Jared] had a bunch of lasers left over from a previous project that he put to use by producing this laser harp. The look of it reminds us of a very small Koto or perhaps an Autoharp (although the chords can't be changed on this model).

We're so glad that [Jared] spent the time to produce such a fine looking body for the instrument. The strings that would traditionally produce the sound on a harp have been replaced with laser diodes shining at Cadmium Sulfide photo resistors. When a beam of light is broken, an Arduino detects the change via the CdS cell and plays a sound through an Altec Lansing speaker inside of the case.

Unfortunately there's no video available but we're pretty sure it makes a "pew-pew" sound. There is a link to download the source code but it points to the overview page instead of downloadable code. From the fritzing diagram the CdS cells are part of a voltage divider which provides digital logic to the Arduino. That should be pretty easy to replicate even without seeing [Jared's] code and we're sure you can source other Arduino instrument projects for tips on wave shield or midi functionality.

[Thanks The Cheap Vegetable Gardener]


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Solution for Surveyor SRV-1 via iPhone (also EDGE) - - 22 Dec 2009

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Inviato da technolando tramite Google Reader:

tramite Surveyor Robotics Journal il 22/12/09

EWE Software has added SRV-1 robot control via iPhone or iPod Touch to their Befree4iPhone remote control program. The software is a freeware, downloaded from www.ewe-software.com/download.html, and it requires no iPhone modification or iPhone market download.



Further discussion of the Befree4iPhone is found on the Surveyor Robotics Forum.
(Posted Tue, 22 Dec 2009 12:53)

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Arduino controlla le luci di Natale a ritmo di musica

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tramite ArduinoFun.com Blog di Administrator il 21/12/09

Internet controlled Christmas lightsArduino Build It! contest entry by: Noel Portugal My xmas-box project consists of an internet controlled Christmas lights and music show. A Christmas song can be requested on-line which is then put in a queue and played in the order it was requested. The music is transmitted on an FM station within a 300 ft radius from my house.

The xmas-box has 8 Channels (power outlets) where different light modes can be played: vu meter style, ascending, descending, split, merge, sequence and random. During each song one of these modes is used randomly every 10 seconds (to make the show less monotonous).I started my research right after Halloween and I came across a couple different options, but I settled with the following combination of hardware : arduino + adafruit wave shield + ioBridge + wifi bridge + solid state relays (SSRs).

The xmas-box is enclosed in a small plastic tool box. I have place it on my deck under a roof ( it is not completely weather proof). The tool box has "3 levels." The bottom is where all the SSRs and AC wiring are located. The middle (the inside tray) contains the wall warts for the arduino (9v), ioBridge (5v) and Wifi Bridge with power. The top level contains the Arduino board, the ioBridge module and the FM transmitter.

Noel has put together a really great Instructable. Rather than attempt to post all the steps here, the remainder of the project can be found on his Instructable.

Great Job Noel!

As as side note I will like to share how much Arduino has changed my life. I am software guy by trade but I have always wanted to bridge the internet with the real world. When I found out about Arduino I rushed to order one of these amazing boards, and I haven't been disappointed. The ability to program it using C (with wiring) and the immense documentation and free libraries make it really easy for anyone with little to no experience to get started with physical computing. My head has been constantly spinning by all the possibilities that I could prototype with this platform.

I hope that any of my experiences shared by my blog could ever help someone else trying to do similar things.

-Noel

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Robot Quadrapod

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tramite Trossen Robotics Blog di Andrew il 18/12/09

Our good friend Jon Hylands, of HUV Robotics (maker of all those awesome 3rd party Bioloid accessories), has recently started a new 4-legged Bioloid based walker named Roz. He is currently using an arbotiX Robocontroller, but has plans to eventually migrate over to a custom Gumstix-Overo platform. He is utilizing the upcoming NUKE (Nearly Universal Kinematics Engine) on the arbotiX, which will be available in public beta in the near future, and is really coming along in his walking gait progress. This has to be one of the fastest AX-12+ servo based walkers I have seen yet, check it out!

Share and Enjoy: TwitThis Facebook Digg MySpace Google E-mail this story to a friend! LinkedIn StumbleUpon Technorati


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Clessidra con arduino

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Inviato da technolando tramite Google Reader:

tramite Hack a Day di Jacob Woj il 21/12/09

[Peter] thought of a creative, way to generate random entropy for under $100.

The USB Hourglass combines a sand timer with a rotating mechanism and an optical beam through the center of the timer to observe the falling sand. The amount of light reaching a detector is digitized at frequent intervals and processed by a microcontroller to determine when to rotate the hourglass. The digitized light levels are also sent by USB to a host PC where they can be used as a source of random entropy. Power is supplied over the USB cable.

With the USB Hourglass, the user can look at the sand falling through the center of the hourglass and monitor the randomness in the USB output data. And one can read the code line-by-line, compile it, and upload it to the microcontroller using only open-source and widely supported tools.


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Neve interattiva con arduino

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Inviato da technolando tramite Google Reader:

tramite Hack a Day di Jacob Woj il 21/12/09

The team at [Sosolimited] was contracted to create an interesting holiday window dispay for the HBO retail store in NYC. The Times Square display encorporates a board of LEDs and a machine for blowing the artificial snow particles around the enclosure.

The code for controlling the LED array was written on top of the open source C++ toolkit, openFrameworks and the entire setup is interfaced through an Arduino Duelmilanove. Multiple Sharp IR sensors were hooked up to the Arduino in order to detect the movement of observers, which in turn triggers fans to blow the 'snow' around. A National Control Devices relay board connects the heavy duty fans to the Arduino. This video demo shows just how attractive the project is in motion.


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POV Globe con Arduino

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tramite Embedded projects from around the web di admin il 18/12/09

If someone telling you that you can build a POV Globe, by only using an Arduino (ATmega328P) and 72 SMD LEDs, what is your first expression? Honestly, you might be feeling shocked and didn't believe on it, isn't it? Well, sometimes, you can turn the impossible into possible, with a little bit of efforts.

Ok, let's cut the crap and jump into the project right away…

For your information, this POV globe is based on an Arduino (ATmega328P), which is capable of displaying monocolour bitmaps upto 72 pixels high and x width. The 72 LEDs allow the one input to get rotation speed instantly.

Arduino POV Globe

The Arduino byte array for the images is generated using the C# program, while the image displayed is synchronized to speed of motor using a reed switch. It enables the images to display around whole globe correctly. Also, it can maintain a constant position of the rotation as well.

Please keep in mind that the reed switch must be hot glued to globe cylinder. Beside that, you should keep your eyes on the magnet, where you have to ensure that the reed switch is close or next with it!


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Clone arduino SEEEDUINO V3.28

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Seeeduino è una scheda compatibile con Arduino Diecimila e basata sul microcontrollore ATmega168. Differisce dal modello Seeeduino V2.12 perchè dispone di maggior memoria flash, EEprom e Sram. La pinout, i fori di fissaggio e le dimensioni sono compatibili al 100% con quelle di Arduino Diecimila. La scheda dispone di 14 I/O (di cui 6 possono essere utilizzati come uscite PWM), 8 ingressi analogici, 32 kB di memoria flash, 2 kB di SRAM e 1 kB di memoria EEPROM. Rispetto alla scheda Arduino Diecimila dispone di alcuni miglioramenti (vedi sotto).

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